Fil Am Fiction: Reading and Rereading Hagedorn et al

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I did say once or twice that teaching Filipino Lit class would start to get repetitive in terms of what I’m reading, though I have to say I have been enjoying all of this reading and rereading. There is something about returning to a text 20 or so years later, and reading it not necessarily with new eyes, but with more emotional and intellectual maturity. Knowing or understanding more, not just about the field of Filipino and Fil Am Lit, but about the world.

Last semester I revisited Jessica Hagedorn’s Dogeaters, and happily found that “postmodern” texts were no longer an immovable block, which students would resist or be unable to access. I thought about and experienced how young readers have become much more sophisticated in their readings of non-linear, multi-vocal, multilingual texts, that popular culture — in part, through science fiction, graphic novels, and comics — have opened up young readers to these non-linear and even quarreling/self-contradicting narratives. Also, these students have had much more access to multicultural literature that I ever did when I was their age. Also, teaching in Bay Area urban centers’ universities brings me into diverse classrooms full of students who are open or willing to be opened. I have also rediscovered that discussing the morally questionable (or morally compromised, or morally challenged) is great! Without judging, trying to avoid imposing our sets of values on different characters, we try our best to understand why they do what they do to themselves and to one another.

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Ongoing Process Notes: Morejón, Hagedorn, Evasco

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A couple of things, as I continue to plug away at the manuscript.

We were fortunate to see Nancy Morejón at La Peña a couple of days ago, and I’m glad we did. There is something about language I’m still working through in my head, something about communicating via translation, and also something about communicating in a language not your Mother Tongue. Mother Tongue has always been a complex thing for me, coming from a family that is fluent in three languages. What is Mother Tongue when you operate in a mixed system of language, what do these things — understanding, speaking, code switching/mixing, fluency, purity — even mean? And what is native?

“As a people, we do not go back,” Morejón said in response to an audience member who wanted to know what her people would do once the Castro brothers eventually pass on. First though, she said, we will bury the dead, because we respect them, something she meant literally, I believe. You literally bury the dead. But it also seemed to relate to “as a people, we do not go back,” and also related to how she described herself, her people, her culture, her language as creole, criollo, hybrid, mixed. This is a fact, not to be despised as deficiency; you take it on and you move on.

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